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Littleton Magazines

A Cosmic Underleague Team

The LITTLETON MAGAZINES are a new cosmic baseball team, created September 7, 1998. The team consists of current and past examples of small literary magazines. By one estimate there are some fifteen hundred such "little" magazines being published in the United States at any given moment. Tracking these publications can be problematic because some of them come and go very quickly. One thing seems universally true about such efforts: they speak with remarkably free and fresh voices. The MAGAZINES will compete in the Underleague during the 1999 season.


1999 Magazines Roster

Antioch Review
Thirdbase
March, 1941. Liberal intellectual magazine.

The Anvil
Shortstop
1933. Published primarily worker-oriented, proletarian literature.

Big Table
Leftfield
Spring, 1959. Began when the Chicago Review was suppressed by University of Chicago bureaucrats.

Black Mountain Review
Outfield
Spring 1954. Primarily a magazine of poetry and criticism. The "Review" was associated with Black Mountain College.

Blue Cloud Quarterly
Coach
1954. Specialized in American Indian literature, music and art.

Caterpillar
Pitcher
1966. Published material included poetry, artwork, film stills, reviews and works in progress.

Dust
Secondbase
1963. Devoted to literature, art and music. Included original work and reviews.

Folder
Catcher
Winter 1953. Published poetry, song music and photographs. Aesthetically influenced by the New York School of poets.

Io
Pitcher
1964. Included articles related to literature, anthropology, natural and physical science and mythology. Thematic issues dealt with topics like "Alchemy" and "Baseball."

Kenyon Review
Owner
Winter 1939. A publication for the "new criticism" featuring poetry, literary criticism and essays on art.

Nommo
Pitcher
Winter 1969. Published by the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC). Featured work by members of the OBAC Writer's Workshop.

Partisan Review
Manager
March 1934. Published poetry, fiction and criticism with a decidely eclectic focus and a politcally liberal orientation

Poetry
Rightfield
October 1912. Continuous publication of poetry and reviews since 1912. Periodic special issues included a collection of anti-Vietnam war poems.

Salmugundi
Firstbase
Fall 1965. Fundamentally a literary magazine, the social sciences also influenced the editorial approach to the publication of articles representative of American left-wing politics.

Shenandoah
Centerfield
Spring 1950. Academic literary magazine with a strong emphasis on Southern writing.

The Sixties
G.M.
1958. Originally "The Fifties" (later "The Seventies") described as a magazine of "Poetry and General Opinion." Noted for its idiosyncratic points of view regarding poetry and cultural trends.

Soulbook
Pitcher
Early 1960s. "The Quarterly of Revolutionary Afro-America." Published by the Berkeley, California-based Afro-American Research Institution. Articles focused on black music, economics, poetry and anti-imperialism.

Trobar
Infield
1960. Published poetry influenced by surrealism and imagism and "plain talk that characterizes the Black Mountain School and many of the Beat poets."

Yardbird Reader
Pitcher
1972. Published "the finest work by Afro-American artists without regard to ideological or aesthetic affiliation." A multi-cultural orientation included African, Asian and Caribbean writers.

Yugen
Infield
1958. Early publication representing Beat-related literature. Self-described representative of a "new consciousness in arts and letters."

Related Outer Links
Antioch Review

Black Mountain Collection

Blue Cloud Quarterly

Kenyon Review

Partisan Review

Underground Publications

"Unspeakable Visions"

Littleton Magazines Starting Roster
Nommo

Pitcher
Folder

Catcher
Salmagundi

Firstbase
Dust

Secondbase
Antioch Review

Thirdbase
The Anvil

Shortstop
Big Table

Leftfield
Shenandoah

Centerfield
Poetry

Rightfield
Partisan Review

Manager
The Sixties

G.M.
Kenyon Review

Owner
Home Park
Print Field
Capacity: 7,999 Seats
Available Player Plates
None at this time
Won-Loss Records
New Cosmic Team for 1999
Little Magazines
There is a similarity to be found between the history of the little magazine in America and the recent history of the World Wide Web. In fact, the WWW offers, in a more profound way, what the traditional little magazine has historically provided: a place for writers and artists to expose their creative work.

The librarian Felix Pollak described a little magazine as "much more than a small magazine that would like to be big." At any given time there are probably less than fifteen hundred "little magazines" actively publishing. It is difficult to gauge this however because it is a characteristic of the small alternative publication that its life span is three issues or less. Generally speaking the alternative magazine is printed in a run of less than 2,000 copies. Many of these publications have less than a few hundred readers. Nevertheless, the little magazine has been a persistent part of American cultural history.

Michael Anania, a poet and former president of the Coordinating Council of Literary Magazines (CCLM) has written that little magazines "have always functioned primarily for writers." As such these non-mainstream publications provide a glimpse into the literary activity and trends of the culture. Often experimental and eclectic, the following characteristics are typical of the little magazine:

  • literary or political in nature
  • small circulation numbers
  • published, edited and financed by one person or a small group of people
  • published without a profit motive

As suggested above, the traditions of the little magazine can be seen in the burgeoning deployment of the World Wide Web as an accessible medium for creative expression. And the need for such creative expression grows daily as we confront a generation educated almost completely by television and therefore desensitized to the creative possibilities of the word crisscrossed with the image.

Reference: The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History. Edited by Elliott Anderson and Mary Kinzie. Pushcart Book Press. New York: 1978.




Additional Information for Selected Magazines
The Antioch Review. Volume 1, No. 1: March 1941. Editorial Board for No.1: J. Donald Kingsley; W. B. Alexander; Paul Bixler; Freeman Champney; George R. Geiger; Lincoln R. Gibbs; Herman Schnurer.


Big Table. Volume 1, No. 1: Spring, 1959. Editor for No.1: Irving Rosenthal. Editor for No. 2 (Summer 1959): Paul Carroll.


The Black Mountain Review. Volume 1 No.1: Spring, 1954. Editor: Robert Creeley.


Blue Cloud Quarterly. Volume 1, No. 1: ?1954. Editor: Brother Benet Tvedten, O.S.B.


Caterpillar. No. 1: October, 1967. Editor: Clayton Eshelman.


The Sixties. No.1-3: 1958-1959; No. 4: Fall, 1960. Editors: Robert Bly, William Duffy.


Io. No. 1: ?1964. Editor No 1: Phi Alpha Psi Society (with thanks to Richard Grossinger, Nels Richardson, Marty Bickman, Randy Gingiss, Lindy Hough.)


The Kenyon Review. Volume 1, No. 1: Winter, 1939. Editor for No. 1: John Crowe Ransom.


The Partisan Review. Volume 1, No. 1: February/March 1934. Editorial Board for No. 1: Nathan Adler, Edward Dahlberg, Joseph Freeman, Sender Garlin, Alfred Hayes, Milton Howard, Joshua Kunitz, Louis Lozowick, Leonard Mins, Wallace Phelps, Philip Rahv, Edwin Rolfe.


Poetry. Volume 1, No. 1: October, 1912. Editor for No. 1: Harriet Monroe.


Salmagundi. Volume 1, No. 1: Fall, 1965. Editor for No. 1: Robert Boyers.


Shenandoah. Volume 1, No. 1: Spring 1950. Editors for No. 1: J. J. Donovan, D.C.G. Kerr, T.K. Wolfe.


The Yardbird Reader. Voulme 1, No. 1: 1972. Editor for No. 1: Ishmael Reed.


Yugen. No. 1: 1958. Editors: LeRoi Jones, Hettie Cohen.






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Littleton Magazines- 1999 Official Team Roster
URL: http://www.cosmicbaseball.com/99lmr.html
Published: September 10, 1998
Copyright © 1998 by the Cosmic Baseball Association
email: editor@cosmicbaseball.com
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