Dharma
Beats

A Cosmic Overleague Team




The DHARMA BEATS represent CBA's team of interesting Beat Generation individuals.

There is a growing interest in the Beat Generation as evidenced by the plethora of academic courses on the Beat writers and other personalities. The recent deaths of Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs have added fuel to this popularity. Several new biographies of Jack Kerouac were published in the last year and the Kerouac estate has plans to issue more previously unpublished work. There are a growing number of websites devoted to Beat-related topics and personalities. This all adds up to a Beat Regeneration.

Ginsberg, a former firstbase poet for the Paradise Pisces, bought the Beats last Fall from Jack Kerouac's mother, Gabrielle who is now the General Manager of another cosmic team from Dharma, the Roses. There are three rookies on the Beats roster for 1999: Ray Bremser, Jack Micheline and David Amram.

The Beats finished in second place last season (91 wins, 71 losses), just behind the Pisces, in the Cosmic Overleague. Since the championship Pisces have been completely revamped for this season, the Beats could be the dominant Overleague squad in 1999.













1999 Dharma Beats


Roster

Rookies are in italics


David Amram, Pitcher
Musician composer and early associate of the Beats.

Recommended: Film score for the movie The Manchurian Candidtate



Levi Asher, Secondbase
Creator of the Beat-related "Literary Kicks" website.
Recommended: Notes from Underground CD.



Ray Bremser, Thirdbase
1934-1998
Beat Generation poet.
Recommended: Blowing Mouth.



William Burroughs, Pitcher
1914-1997
A founding member of the Beat Generation.
Recommended: Naked Lunch.



Lucien Carr, Shortstop
College student friend of the founders of the Beat Generation and theorist of the "New Vision."



Neal Cassady, Pitcher
1926-1968
Beat Generation writer, muse and later "chauffer" of the Merry Pranksters.
Recommended: The First Third.



Gregory Corso, Firstbase
b. 1930
Beat Generation poet.
Recommended: Gasoline.



Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Rightfield
b. 1919
Beat Generation associate and member of the San Francisco literary renaissance.
Recommended: Starting From San Francisco.



John Clellon Holmes, Infield
1926-1988
Friend and associate of Beat Generation founders.
Recommended: Go.



Herbert Huncke, Catcher
1915-1996
Writer and early associate of the founders of the Beat Generation.
Recommended: The Herbert Huncke Reader.



Jack Kerouac, Leftfield
1922-1969
A writer and founder of the Beat Generation. Crowned "King of the Beats" by the media.
Recommended: Visions of Cody.



Jack Micheline, Pitcher
1929-1998
Beat Generation writer and poet.

Recommended: North of Manhattan.



Charles Plymell, Centerfield
b. 1935
Hobohemian writer and poet influenced by members of the Beat Generation.

Recommended: Last of the Moccasins.



Kenneth Rexroth, Outfield
1905-1982
Associate of the Beat Generation and a leader of the San Francisco literary renaissance.
Recommended: In Defense of the Earth.



Gary Snyder, Pitcher
b. 1930
Beat Generation poet and Buddhist.
Recommended: "Note on the Religious Tendencies.".



Lew Welch, Pitcher
1926-1971?
Writer, poet and friend of the Beat Generation founders.
Recommended: I Remain.(Letters)



Philip Whalen, Infield
b. 1923
Beat Generation poet and Buddhist monk.
Recommended: Self-Portrait from Another Direction .



Staff


Robert Kelly, Field Manager
b. 1934
American poet and teacher.
Recommended: The Loom.



Gerald Nicosia, Coach
Beat Generation scholar and Jack Kerouac biographer.
Recommended: Memory Babe (Biography of Jack Kerouac).



John Sampas, General Manager
Literary executor of the Jack Kerouac estate.



Allen Ginsberg, Team Owner
1926-1997
Beat Generation poet. A founder and senior spokesman for the Beats.
Recommended: Kaddish and Other Poems (1958-1960).













Starters
Burroughs

Pitcher
Huncke

Catcher
Corso

Firstbase
Asher

Secondbase
Bremser

Thirdbase
Carr

Shortstop
Kerouac

Leftfield
Plymell

Centerfield
Ferlinghetti

Rightfield
Kelly

Manager
Sampas

G.M.
Ginsberg

Owner
Home Park
DharmaDome
Capacity: 33,333
Cosmic Player Plates

Former Team Members




Won-Lost Records

Dharma Beats

YEAR		WON	LOST

1983		74	88
1984		75	68
1985		68	86
1987		53	109
1988		85	77
1989		82	80
1990		73	89
1991		89	73
1992		79	83
1993		86	76
1994		75	87
1995		82	80
1996		73	89
1997		86	76
1998		91	71

Total		1171	1232
		
1998 Beat Stats


.

Other Rosters

1995 Beats Roster

1996 Beats Roster

1997 Beats Roster

1998 Beats Roster


Related Roster: 1999 Dharma Roses


Other Cosmic Team Rosters




.

Related External Links

The Beat Regeneration
A month before he died Jack Kerouac told an interviewer, "I'm not a beatnik. I'm a Catholic." Strange words from the man the New York Times in its obituary called the "Father of the Beat Generation." And while Kerouac had become more culturally conservative in the years before his death in 1969 at the age of 47, his disownership of the generation he helped create is not that ironic.

Barbara Ehrenreich identifies two variants of the "Beat" movement in her book The Hearts of Men. The original "Beats" were the "hot" and "mad to live" rebels depicted in Kerouac's novel On the Road. And then, subsequently, there were the "beatniks" who were "cool" imitators. This latter strain was largely formed by media stereotyping.

A common thread uniting the original Beat aesthetic was its search for "honesty." Kerouac's spontaneous bop prosody which rejects revision is really a formal device directed at the true representation of the writer's vision.

This vision was consistent with the notion that mid-20th century American culture was homogenized, phony and corrupt. There was no truth to be found in the rows of ticky tack homes located along the pleasantly named roads and avenues in the regimented gloom of the glum suburbs.

The Beats thought that the honest truth was more likely to be found near the fringe, at the edge of society: in New York's Times Square with the junkies, in Mexico City with a prostitute or in Kansas where the hobos and other fellaheen rode freight trains out of Emerald City. The beatnik imitators found time on the weekends to complain about their routinized, sanitized, depersonalized weekday commute to and from convention in between backyard bar-b-queuing.

Each of the original Beat writers substantially and honestly rejected middle-class family conventions. Kerouac was a poor husband and a negligent father who rejected his daughter and avoided his financial obligations to her. Burroughs accidentally shot and killed his common-law wife and then spent much of his love life with men. Ginsberg announced his passionate homosexuality at a time when it was not politically correct. None of these men established conventional family structures.

There is at the moment a sort of Beat Regeneration occurring. It is fueled by the natural appeal the Beat aesthetic has for the young and restless at heart. It is manifested in the books, exhibitions, and CDs available for sale and the numerous websites on the internet dealing with Beat matters. Several biographies of Kerouac have been published in the last year. The recent deaths of Ginsberg and Burroughs within a short period of time of each other has further stimulated interest in the Beats both in the classrooms of high schools and colleges and in the minds of marketeers. What is motivating the regeneration? Is it the original strain or another mutant imitation that's regenerating?

Is the Beat Regeneration a hot passion for creative honesty and social nonconformity or is it just a cool thing to get into on the weekends?






top
CBA menuRosters




1999 Dharma Beats- Official Team Roster
URL: http://www.cosmicbaseball.com/99dbr.html
Published: January 25, 1999
Updated: February 27, 1999
Copyright © 1999 by the Cosmic Baseball Association
email: editor@cosmicbaseball.com

734