1997 Official Team Roster


The TELECITY SUPERBAS compete in the Cosmic Middle League and consist of television stars and personalities.




Link to 1998 Telecity Superbas Roster



The Team





Steve Allen

Pitcher



Gillian Anderson

Pitcher
Rookie


Christina Applegate

Centerfield
Rookie


Lucille Ball

Thirdbase



Milton Berle

Pitcher



Carl Betz

Outfield



Joey Bishop

Rightfield



Raymond Burr

Pitcher



Johnny Carson

Pitcher



Dick Clark

Infield



Imogene Coca

Pitcher



Jackie Gleason

Leftfield



Tea Leoni

Pitcher
Rookie


Shari Lewis

Pitcher



Ed McMahon

Catcher/Outfield



Clayton Moore

Outfield



David Nelson

Secondbase



Ozzie Nelson

Infield



Carl Reiner

Catcher/Infield



Rob Schneider

Shortstop
Rookie


Phil Silvers

Pitcher



Danny Thomas

Firstbase



Robert Young

Pitcher



Jay North

Field Manager



Sam Denoff

Coach



Bill Persky

Coach



Clarabell

General Manager



Howdy Doody

Owner



Teledrome

Home Park











Steve Allen

Pitcher


The Tonight Show (1954-1957)

The Steve Allen Show (1956-1960)




The original host of NBC's Tonight Show (1954-1957) Steve Allen spent 90 minutes each weeknight showcasing comedians, musicians and writers. Andy Williams, Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme, Don Knotts and Louis Nye were frequent guests.

Allen hosted the weekly Steve Allen Show (1956-1960) with his wife Jayne Meadows. Allen is also a composer and author. He wrote the popular song "This Could Be the Start of Something Big" and he has authored over 20 books. In 1961 he wrote an autobiography called Mark It and Strike It.




Steve Allen Biography







Gillian Anderson

Pitcher


X-Files (1993- currently in production )



Gillian Anderson has hit the television big leagues with her portrayal of FBI Special Agent Dana Scully on the X-Files series.

Born August 9, 1968 in Chicago, her family moved to Michigan when she was 11.

She started acting in high school at age 17 and went to DePaul University where she received a Bachelor's degree in Fine Arts.

She went to New York to establish an acting career. In 1988 she had a role in the feature film The Turning and by 1991 she was in Hollywood.

She currently lives in Vancouver where X-Files is produced with her husband and young daughter.




Gillian Anderson at Yahoo!





Gillian Anderson Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)









Christina Applegate

Centerfield


Heart of the City (1986)

Married With Children (1987-1996)



Christina Applegate played Kelly Bundy, the fantastically beautiful but remarkably stupid daughter on the popular Married With Children situation comedy. Born in Los Angeles on November 25, 1971, the 5'5" natural blond made her first television appearance on the soap opera Days of Our Lives in 1972 at the age of 3 months in her mother's arms. Applegate's mother, Nancy Priddy, an actress, who divorced her record promoter husband when Christina was an infant, was herself an actress.

Her early television work included a number of guest spots on popular shows (she was a member of Alex Keating's girlfriend's band on the comedy Family Ties) and was a regular cast member on the short-lived series Heart of the City.

In addition to her television career, Applegate has appeared in several feature films including the 1991 Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead and more recently in Mars Attacks (1996).




Christina Applegate at NetVision








Lucille Ball

Thirdbase


I Love Lucy (1951-1957)

The Lucy Show (1962-1968)

Here's Lucy (1968-1974)



Shortly after meeting on the set of the movie Too Many Girls in 1940, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz were married. Arnaz had emigrated from Cuba to Miami in 1933, became a bandleader and went to Hollywood a few years later. Lucille Desiree Ball started acting when she was in high school. After working in the movies in the 1930s and 1940s she moved to radio with a role in the show My Favorite Husband. This radio program contained the seed of the I Love Lucy television show which first aired on CBS October 15, 1951, with an episode entitled "The Girls Want to Go to a Nightclub."

From the beginning I Love Lucy was a popular hit with the TV audience. It ranked third overall at the end of its first season and in April 1952 it became the first TV show to be seen in over 10 million American homes. By May 1952 the show was the subject of a Time magazine cover story. During its second season Lucille Ball's pregnancy was worked into the show and on January 19, 1953 the birth episode was aired (it had been filmed in November). Coincidentally, Lucy gave birth to her second son, Desi Arnaz IV, on the same day the show aired.

During its 6 seasons I Love Lucy placed first during its 2nd (1952-1953), 3rd (1953-1954), and 4th (1954-1955) seasons. It fell to second behind the $64,000 Question game show in its fifth season (1955-1956) but regained the number one spot in its sixth and final season (1956-1957). The last episode, "The Ricardos Dedicate a Statue", aired on June 24, 1957.

180 total episodes of I Love Lucy were filmed, of which 179 have been in constant syndication. Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz divorced and in 1961 she married television producer Gary Morton.

On October 1, 1962 she premiered in a new comedy show called The Lucy Show. She played Lucy Carmichael. The last episode of the Lucy Show aired September 16, 1968 and a week later, playing Lucille Carter she started her third comedy show Here's Lucy which ran until September 2, 1974.




Lucille Ball @ Yahoo!




Lucy: A Tribute to the Queen of Comedy








Milton Berle

Pitcher


The Milton Berle Show [Texaco Star Theater] (1948-1953)

The Buick-Berle Show (1953-1955)

The Milton Berle Show (1955-1956)

The Kraft Music Hall (1958-1959)

The Milton Berle Show (1966-1967)



Berle was television's first superstar. From his first stage appearance at the age of five, his background in vaudeville, radio and films made him keenly aware of the new medium's potential for entertainment.

His original show, sponsored by Texaco was a comedy/variety package that aired on Tuesday evenings creating noticeably low turnouts at theaters and clubs on that night because everyone stayed home to watch Berle. During 1949 television ownership passed the one million mark, in part because of "Uncle Miltie".

Earning the moniker "Mr. Television" Berle signed a 30-year contract in 1951 with NBC that paid him $200,000 per year. Later re-negotiated, that early deal attests to the growing impact of television and television visionaries like Milton Berle.




Milton Berle at Starwave








Carl Betz

Outfield


The Donna Reed Show (1958-1966)

Judd for the Defense (1967-1969)



Betz played Alex Stone, a suburban pediatrician in the Donna Reed Show, one of the most wholesome and squeaky-clean, conflict-free situation comedies ever foisted on Americans living in their ticky-tack homes. The show did not do well its first season, but then it moved to Thursday nights where it became one of TV's longest running series.

After the show ended, Betz became a lawyer in the cheesy law drama Judd for the Defense. He played the not so crafty lawyer, Clinton Judd. Betz won a 1969 Emmy for "Outstanding Continued Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Dramatic Series" for his work on the Judd series.




TV Families of the 50's








Joey Bishop

Rightfield


The Joey Bishop Show (1961-1965)

The Joey Bishop Show (1967-1969)



The first Joey Bishop Show was a situation comedy that ran four seasons from September 20, 1961 to September 7, 1965. Bishop played Joey Barnes, an unmarried publicist. His sister Stella was played by Marlo Thomas. Marlo's father was Danny Thomas, who's company made the show. The producers changed the format for the second season of the show and now Joey Barnes was married and employed as a nightclub comedian. Abby Dalton played Bishop's wife. Funnyman Joe Besser played Mr. Jillson, Bishop's landlord.

The second Joey Bishop Show (1967-1969) was a late night talk show. Bishop replaced Les Crane on April 17, 1967 and hosted until he was replaced by Dick Cavett in late December 1969. Bishop's sidekick on this show was Regis Philbin who would later achieve some acclaim as a morning talk show host.

Bishop has frequently been a member of celebrity panels for a variety of television game shows including Keep Talking (1958-1960) and Celebrity Sweepstakes (1974-1976).




Joey Bishop at Videoflicks








Raymond Burr

Pitcher


Perry Mason (1957-1966)

Ironside (1967-1975)

Kingston: Confidential (1977)



Erle Stanley Gardner created his fiction criminal lawyer in 1933. A series of popular books led to a radio program that lasted until 1955.

On September 21, 1957 after beating out the likes of William Hopper and Fred MacMurray for the role of Mason, Raymond Burr appeared in the first episode called "The Case of the Restless Redhead."

Perry Mason had a successful nine year run breaking into the top twenty during its second season (1957-1958). The show was fifth on the ratings chart in its fifth season (1961-1962).

Contrary to popular myth, Perry Mason did not win all of his some 270 televised cases. In a Fall 1963 episode entitled "The Case of the Deadly Verdict" the jury found Mason's client guilty.

After Perry Mason, Burr starred for eight years in the police drama series Ironside. Burr played Robert T. Ironside, Chief of Detectives for the San Francisco Police Department. Chief Ironside was confined to a wheelchair because his legs were paralyzed during an assassination attempt. Like Perry Mason, Chief Ironside had an uncanny understanding of the criminal mind.

A notable role came in 1973 when Burr played Pope John XXIII in an ABC biodrama called Portrait: A Man Whose Name Was John.

In 1977 Burr played journalist R. B. Kingston in the short-lived and forgettable drama series Kingston: Confidential.

Burr won Emmy Awards in 1959 and 1961 for his work on the Perry Mason show.




Raymond Burr at Mr. Showbiz








Johnny Carson

Pitcher


Earn Your Vacation (1954)

The Johnny Carson Show (1955-1956)

Who Do You Trust? (1957-1962)

The Tonight Show (1962-1992)



As a 27 year old comedian with experience writing comedy for Red Skelton and hosting a local Los Angeles television show, the network brass picked Johnny Carson to host Earn Your Vacation, a primetime TV game show. The show had been hosted on the radio by Steve Allen since 1951.

In 1955 and 1956 Carson hosted the variety-oriented Johnny Carson Show. It lasted for 39 weeks and consisted of parodies and other humorous skits.

On September 30, 1957 Carson took over the revamped game show Who Do You Trust? (originally called Do You Trust Your Wife? and later called Whom Do You Trust?). Now a day time game show the format consisted of Carson interviewing and asking questions of husband/wife teams. In the Fall of 1958 Ed McMahon replaced Bill Nimmo as the show's announcer and thus began a longterm association between Carson and McMahon.

Carson and McMahon left the game show when Carson replaced Jack Paar on NBC's late night entry, The Tonight Show. Carson was the third major host of the long running show. (Steve Allen was the original host when the show first aired on September 27, 1954.)

Carson reigned as king of the late night time slot for nearly 30 years finally retiring and yielding to Jay Leno in early 1992.

In 1964 Carson appeared in the feature film Looking for Love and in 1965, he published a book called Happiness Is a Dry Martini.




Johnny Carson at Starwave








Dick Clark

Infield

American Bandstand (1957- present)



Originally a local show in Philadelphia, it was just called Bandstand when Bob Horn hosted this dance music show from 1952 to 1956.

Dick Clark, a Philadelphia disc jockey came on the scene in 1956 and took over the host's job from Horn. In 1957 the show was renamed American Bandstand when it was nationally telecast to over 60 affiliated ABC stations. From 1957 until 1964 the show was produced at the studios of Philadelphia TV station WFIL.

American Bandstand moved to Los Angeles in 1964. It holds the singular distinction of being the very first television program devoted exclusively to rock and roll music culture.

Clark escaped serious harm during the 1959 payola scandals that rocked the music industry. He did testify before a congressional committee and steadfastly claimed that he never was paid to play a song on American Bandstand. Unscathed he continued to host the popular program.




Dick Clark's American Bandstand








Imogene Coca

Pitcher


Admiral Broadway Review (1949)

Your Show of Shows (1950-1954)

The Imogene Coca Show (1954-1955)

Sid Caesar Invites You (1958)

Grindl (1963-1964)

It's About Time (1966-1967)



When Imogene Coca met Sid Caesar, she was already a talented and experienced actress/comedienne. She had grown up in a show business family.

Caesar and Coca first met on the Admiral Broadway Review show, a Friday night variety hour that was essentially a warm-up exercise for the brilliant Your Show of Shows which begin its run on February 25, 1950. Over 160 live performances established Your Show of Shows as one of the greatest examples of early television art. Your Show of Shows aired for four seasons, for ninety minutes each Saturday night. In addition to Caesar and Coca, Carl Reiner and Howard Morris contributed to the wild high jinx typical of the show. Caesar and Coca perfected the ill-suited husband&wife team of Charlie and Doris Hickenlooper.

Coca won an Emmy award in 1951 for Best Actress and a Peabody television entertainment award for her work on Your Show of Shows in 1953.

After the end of the variety shows she attempted several other projects including It's About Time wherein she played Shad, a stone age woman brought to the modern world.




Filmography for Imogene Coca








Jackie Gleason

Outfield


Cavalcade of Stars (1950-1952)

The Life of Riley (1949-1950)

The Jackie Gleason Show [The Honeymooners] (1952-1970)

You're In The Picture (1961)



The Honeymooners concept began while Gleason hosted the Dumont network's variety show Cavalcade of Stars (first telecast in 1949, Gleason became host in 1950).

Considered one of the all time great comedy classics, The Honeymooners was for much of its run, a series within a series. Gleason played the volatile Ralph Kramden, a New York City bus driver who lived with his wife in a small sparse childless apartment. His wife Alice (first played by Pert Kelton during the Cavalcade of Stars episode) and neighbors Ed and Trixie Norton completed the cast.

Before The Honeymooners, Gleason starred in the television sitcom Life of Riley about Chester A. Riley a hard-luck blue-collar man that many have compared to Archie Bunker of All in the Family fame. The Life of Riley ceased production after 26 weeks (but reappeared nearly 2 years later with William Bendix in the lead role).

Gleason's most notable flop was the one episode of a game show called You're In The Picture, described by Gleason who canned it after one week as a "bomb". Gleason apologized to the television audience the following week.

Gleason won a Peabody Award for Television Entertainment in 1955.




The Honeymooners








Ta Leoni

Pitcher


Santa Barbara (1984)

Flying Blind (1992)

The Naked Truth (1995- still in production )



Born February 25, 1966 in New York City, Ta Pantleoni has, some thirty years, later achieved her place on the television star charts. As the star of the situation comedy The Naked Truth, she plays the brash, strong-willed photojournalist, Nora Wilde, who works for a sleazy tabloid newspaper.

In some ways the Nora Wilde character resonates with her earlier role as Alicia in the short-lived comedy Flying Blind. Alicia, like Nora, was brimming with spirit, a gregarious and sexy soul. There are even roots of Nora in Leoni's 1984 portrayal of Lisa Dinapoli in the evening soap opera series Santa Barbara.

On May 6, 1997 in New York, Ta Leone married David Duchovny, himself a big star as Special Agent Fox Muldur in the The X-Files drama series. It was Ms. Leoni's second marriage.




Tea Leoni Unofficial Home Page








Shari Lewis

Pitcher


The Shari Lewis Show (1960-1963)

The Shari Show (1975)



The Shari Lewis showed premiered on Saturday morning October 1, 1960. Shari Lewis first came to the public's attention with an appearance on the prime time talent show Talent Scouts. She performed with her puppets who included Lamb Chop, Hush Puppy and Charlie Horse.

The Shari Show, produced in 1975 was a half-hour syndicated puppet show.




Hangin' With Shari Lewis








Ed McMahon

Catcher


Who Do You Trust? (1958-1962)

The Tonight Show (1962-1992)



Ed McMahon is surely the best known second banana in television history. He met Johnny Carson in the fall of 1958 when he joined the show Who Do You Trust as an announcer. Carson was the host.

When Carson left the show to replace Jack Paar on NBC's Tonight Show, McMahon went with him. An all purpose second banana, McMahon's responsibilities ranged from audience warm-up man, announcer, commercial spokesman and most usually a foil for Johnny himself.

In addition to his over 30 years service to Carson, McMahon, who started his career as a pitchman on Atlantic City's boardwalk, frequently appeared in commercials.

McMahon also hosted a variety of TV games shows including Missing Links (1963-1964), Snap Judgment (1967-1969), and Whodunnit (1979).




Ed McMahon Biography




My Hero, Ed McMahon








Clayton Moore

Outfield


The Lone Ranger (1949-1957)



The Lone Ranger first aired on television on September 15, 1949 and quickly became one of TV's most popular western series. A total of 221 episodes were made when the show was discontinued on September 12, 1957.

Clayton Moore (1914-1999) starred as the Lone Ranger in most, but not all of the episodes. Actor John Hart appeared as the leading character in at least 26 episodes during the 1951 and 1953 seasons.




Largent's Lone Ranger Page




Clayton Moore Information




David Nelson

Secondbase


The Ozzie & Harriet Show (1952-1966)



David and his brother Ricky began playing themselves (the Nelsons' sons) when The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet show was on the radio. For the radio show's first five years actors were used to play the boys, but beginning in 1949 during its fifth radio season the boys stepped up to the microphones. When the radio show ended in 1954 the television version was already in its second of fourteen seasons.

After the series, David got into television producing. He was the producer on the pathetic Ozzie's Girls (1973) sequel which floundered as a syndicated sitcom.




Traditional Family Values








Ozzie Nelson

Infield


The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet (1952-1966)



Ozzie Nelson, endowed with a law school degree, created, helped write, directed and starred in the Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, which when it stopped after 14 seasons was the longest running situation comedy in the brief and young history of television.

Calling it the "adventures" of this real-life family (Harriet was Ozzie's real wife and David and Ricky were real sons and brothers) is rather ironic. Nobody did very much. In fourteen seasons we never found out what Ozzie did for a living, nor was it ever a subject of any episode. Ozzie was usually found tinkering in the yard and Harriet was usually in the kitchen and the boys were usually in their room. As Ricky got older the show supplied exposure to help him with his musical career. Many episodes featured a Ricky Nelson musical segment.

The last episode was telecast on September 3, 1966. Seven years later, Ozzie got back into television with a lame sequel called Ozzie's Girls wherein the Nelsons rent the boys' room to two young women. David Nelson produced this poorly received effort.


NOTE: Harriet Nelson is General Manager of the 1997 Vestal Virgins.




TV Families of the 50's








Carl Reiner

Catcher

54th Street Revue (1949-1950)

Your Show of Shows (1951-1954)

The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961-1966)

The Celebrity Game (1964-1965)

Linus The Lionhearted (1964-1966)



Carl Reiner is one of television's most creative funny people. Reiner got his television career going as a regular on the Thursday night variety hour show from New York, called the 54th Street Revue (1949-1950).

He joined Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows during its second season (1951-1952) (replacing Tom Avera as one of the regulars.) This began an association with Sid Caesar that continued in 1954 when Reiner became a regular on the Caesar's Hour program. It continued in 1955 when he directed the Sid Caesar Presents show. In 1958 on the Sid Caesar Invites You program, Reiner was again a regular member of the show.

Immediately after Your Show of Shows stopped its run in 1954, Reiner took a gig as a member of the celebrity guest panel on the game show Droodles. In 1958 Reiner succeeded Monty Hall as the host of the prime time game show called Keep Talking.

On October 3, 1961 The Dick Van Dyke Show began its 5 year run. Carl Reiner and his associates Bill Persky and Sam Denoff were responsible for the show's creation. Reiner also appeared as Alan Brady, the vain host of a television show that employed Rob Petry (Van Dyke) as a writer.

Reiner again hosted a prime time game show called the Celebrity Game (1964-1965) and he was the voice of Sascha Grouse and Dinny Kangaroo on the Saturday morning children's cartoon show called Linus the Lionhearted (1964-1966).

In 1967, Reiner and his pals Persky and Denoff created Good Morning World which has the distinction of being the first sitcom to take place at a radio station. The show lasted one season.

In 1971 Reiner tried to revive his earlier success by creating the New Dick Van Dyke Show which lasted three seasons. Another sitcom called Lotsa Luck lasted for part of a season (1973-1974).

In 1976 Reiner starred in Good Heavens where he played the part of an Angel that comes to Earth to do good and make people laugh. Reiner was also the show's executive producer.

Carl Reiner ranks with Milton Berle, Jackie Gleason, Lucille Ball, Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca as an early influential shaper of the emergent medium of television.




Filmography for Carl Reiner








Rob Schneider

Shortstop


Saturday Night Live (1991-1994 )

Men Behaving Badly (1997- still in production )



Rob Schneider got his big break from Lorne Michaels, producer of the Saturday Night Live Comedy show. Schneider joined the show in 1991 and developed some very memorable characters including the photocopy man Richard "The Richmeister" Laymer.

Just prior to joining SNL Schneider appeared in the film Martians Go Home and during his tenure at SNL he appeared in the Home Alone 2 movie sequel.

After leaving SNL in 1994 he appeared alongside Sylvester Stallone in the feature film Judge Dredd and in the comedy film Down Periscope with Kelsey Grammer.

In 1996 he was one of the two Men Behaving Badly in the new situation comedy about men and men and women. Playing the role of Jamie Coleman, a freeloading unemployed freelance photographer, the show comically explores the less refined aspects of people relating to each other.




Rob Schneider Information




Rob Schneider at Men Behaving Badly Site








Phil Silvers

Pitcher


The Arrow Show (1948-1949)

You'll Never Get Reach [The Phil Silvers Show, Sgt. Bilko] (1955-1959)

The New Phil Silvers Show (1963-1964)



Silvers was one of the performers on Milton Berle's first show telecast on September 21, 1948. Later that year he was chosen to be the host of a new half-hour Thursday night variety show. Silvers left The Arrow Show for a job on Broadway in the play High Button Shoes.

Six years later he began a four-season run in the hit comedy show You'll Never Get Rich (later called the Phil Silvers Show and in syndication called Sgt. Bilko). Silvers played Master Sergeant Ernie Bilko a sly con man who never quite pulls off his capers. The show was created by Nat Hiken who's next television effort was the sitcom Car 54 Where Are You? Silvers' show was notable for being one of the very few television shows to feature black actors. You'll Never Get Rich won an Emmy award for best comedy series in 1955.

The New Phil Silvers Show featured Silvers in the role of Harry Grafton, a plant foreman for a large company. Like Bilko, Grafton is a schemer who never quite succeeds in his get-rich-quick machinations. The show lasted less than a year.




Sgt. Bilko Episode Guide








Danny Thomas

Firstbase


Four Star Revue (1950-1951)

Make Room for Daddy [The Danny Thomas Show] (1953-1964)

The Danny Thomas Hour (1967-1968)

Make Room for Granddaddy (1970-1971)

The Practice (1976-1977)



Thomas starred in Make Room for Daddy, one of the few situation comedies that aired for more than 10 seasons. He played Danny Williams and despite his marital changes during the show's run, this was another example of early family-values programming.

Prior to Make Room for Daddy, Thomas had been one of four rotating hosts on a Wednesday night variety hour called Four Star Revue which premiered October 4, 1950. (The other hosts were Jack Carson, Jimmy Durante and Ed Wynn).

When Make Room for Daddy appeared (first episode telecast September 29, 1953) Danny played a married entertainer with two children. After three seasons the show was renamed The Danny Thomas Show and the character Danny Williams was now a widower. He was remarried during the fifth season (1957-1958).

After the end of Make Room for Daddy (last episode telecast on September 14, 1964) Thomas hosted The Danny Thomas Hour a variety show that featured musical numbers, comedy and filmed segments. In 1970 Thomas tried a sequel called Make Room for Granddaddy where he reprised his Danny Williams character. The sequel lasted one season.

Thomas' last role in a situation comedy was in the The Practice. He played Jules Bedford, a New York City doctor. This show also lasted only one season.

Thomas' contribution to television and comedy was passed down to his daughter Marlo Thomas who starred in the popular That Girl series (1966-1971). Thomas' production company, Danny Thomas Productions produced That Girl which had been created by Bill Persky and Sam Denoff, veterans of the original Dick Van Dyke Show (1961-1966).




A&E Makes Room for Danny








Robert Young

Pitcher


Father Knows Best (1954-1962)

Window on Main Street (1961-1962)

Marcus Welby, M.D. (1969-1976)



Robert Young has played paternal types endowed with paternal conservative wisdom in two popular television series. Father Knows Best, started as a radio show in 1949 and made the move to the television screen on October 3, 1954.

Young played Jim Anderson, insurance agent, husband and father of three children in the very safely American town of Springfield. Originally faltering because it aired at 10 p.m. on Sunday nights when few children could watch the show, the series became successful in its second season when it moved to a new day and time slot.

There were 203 episodes made of this family-values series. The final episode aired on September 17, 1962.

After Father Knows Best, Young starred as Cameron Garrett Brooks, crusty novelist, in Window on Main Street. The writer returns to his roots to write about the people from his hometown of Millsburg. The show lasted only one season (1961-1962).

On September 23, 1969, Robert Young returned to regular television with his hit medical drama series, Marcus Welby, M.D. Dr. Welby was America's doctor, a more fully developed Jim Anderson extending his paternalism to a wider family of patients and colleagues alike. The Welby series lasted seven seasons, watched no doubt, by many bedridden citizens. Its final episode aired on May 11, 1976.




TV Families of the 50's








Jay North

Field Manager


Dennis the Menace (1959-1963)



Jay North starred in 146 half-hour episodes of Dennis the Menace. He played Dennis Mitchell, the pleasant but mischievous young boy based on a cartoon character created by Hank Ketchum. Ketchum actually had a son named Dennis.

After his role with the show ended, North did not really see television success again.











Sam Denoff

Coach


TV Show Creator



Sam Denoff and his partner Bill Persky were writers together on the landmark Your Show of Shows show in the early days of television. In frequent collaboration with Carl Reiner, Denoff and Persky created, wrote and produced several very popular television programs.

The two biggest hits they were directly responsible for were The Dick Van Dyke Show and That Girl. There were also a few flops such as The Funny Side (1971), The Montefuscos (1975), and Big Eddie (1975).

Denoff was responsible for a couple of solo productions including the sitcom On Our Own (1978) and Turnabout (1979). Neither show was popular or critically well-received.











Bill Persky

Coach


TV Show Creator



see Sam Denoff











Clarabell

General Manager


The Howdy Doody Show (1947-1960)



When the 2,343rd and last Howdy Doody Show aired on September 30, 1960 Clarabel who had never spoken one word in thirteen seasons finally talked. He simply said "Goodbye kids."

Clarabel who communicated with Howdy Doody and the other denizens of Doodyville by honking (similar to the superb mime Harpo Marx) was one of the many characters Buffalo Bob Smith created for this children's show, an ancestor to the Sesame Streets and Barney's of the later 20th century. Bob Keeshan, who later became the well-loved Captain Kangaroo, was the first of three actors to play Clarabell. Bobby Nicholson and then Lew Anderson also played the voiceless clown.













Howdy Doody

Team Owner


Howdy Doody Show (1947-1960)



The first Howdy Doody puppet was designed by Frank Paris and the puppet did not have the smiling freckle-face features we remember. Several weeks after the show premiered on December 27, 1947 (it was first called Puppet Playhouse), Paris left the show and Howdy got a radical face.

The Howdy Doody Show was television's first popular children's show. It was the idea of Bob Smith and its simple setting (the audience was the "peanut gallery") and friendly characters, like Clarabell, appealed to the baby boomers who were still babies. One character, Chief Thunderthud would periodically cry out "kawabunga" just the way the Ninja Turtles did it almost 40 years later.

Smith tried to revive the show in the 1970s, but as Bob Dylan predicted in the 1960s, the times had changed and so had American youth.











The Teledome

Home Park

44,197 capacity







Link to 1996 Telecity Superbas Roster




















Top Home News Rosters 1997 Book Games Email




1997 Telecity Superbas Official Team Roster
URL http://www.cosmicbaseball.com/97tsr.html
Published: July 15, 1997
Revised: December 28, 1999

Copyright © 1997,1998 by the Cosmic Baseball Association
Email: editor@cosmicbaseball.com

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