1997 Pre-Raphaelite Baseball Club Roster




1997 Pre-Raphaelites
Official Player Roster
Team Photo Roster
The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
"Truth to Nature"
Early Reaction to the P.R.B.
The Germ
"P.R.B." by Christina Rossetti
Pre-Raphaelite Outer Links
Notes
References
Pre-Raphaelite Cosmic Player Plates
1998 Official PRB Team Roster
Cosmic Baseball Association Menu
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Player Roster







Infielders



Edward Burne-Jones
Secondbase







Arthur Hughes
Infield







James Leathart
Infield



Player Plate






Jane Morris
Thirdbase







William Morris
Firstbase







John B. Shaw
Catcher







Elizabeth Siddal
Shortstop



Player Plate






Algernon Swinburne
Catcher



Player Plate










Outfielders



Ford Madox Brown
Centerfield








Fanny Cornforth
Outfield







Annie Miller
Leftfield







John Ruskin
Rightfield







William Bell Scott
Outfield



Player Plate




Maria Zambaco
Outfield



Player Plate









Pitchers



James Collinson
Pitcher







William H. Hunt
Pitcher







John Millais
Pitcher



Player Plate






Christina Rossetti
Pitcher








Dante Rossetti
Pitcher



Player Plate




Mrs. Frances Rossetti
Pitcher







Maria Rossetti
Pitcher







William Rossetti
Pitcher







F. G. Stephens
Pitcher







Thomas Woolner
Pitcher







Staff



William Allingham
Field Manager





Vernon Lushington
Coach




Henry Wallis
Coach




Alice Wilding
Coach




Coventry Patmore
General Manager




Charles Augustus Howell
Owner




Amber Fields
Home Field







Photo Roster




Photo Key from Top Row, left-to-right:
Brown, Burne-Jones, Collinson (n.a.), Cornforth, Hughes (n.a.)
Hunt (n.a.), Leathart, Millais, Miller, J. Morris
W. Morris, C. Rossetti, D. Rossetti, F. Rossetti, M. Rossetti
W. Rossetti, Ruskin, Scott, Shaw (n.a.), Siddal
Stephens (n.a.), Swinburne, Woolner, Zambaco






The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood


The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was formed in England in the Fall of 1848 by seven young men. The Brotherhood as a distinct entity lasted only several years but its underlying aesthetic had a great impact on the development of modern aesthetics. As one commentator has observed, the Brotherhood "served as the shock troops in the assault on bourgeois complacency."[1].

The members of the Brotherhood included its leader, the painter and poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti, his civil servant brother William Michael Rossetti, the painters William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, Frederick George Stephens and James Collinson, and the sculptor Thomas Woolner. All of the founding members were young, under the age of 24, and all but William Rossetti had attended or were attending art school.

These young "knights of art" found the contemporary state of English painting and poetry to be in "anything but a vital or a lively condition." Like other youth movements in history, the members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood reacted to the complacency of the status quo.







"Truth to Nature"

The guiding principle of the Brotherhood is summed up in their maxim "Truth to Nature."

"Truth to Nature, as understood by the Pre-Raphaelites, was in fact a limited kind of truth. It was exact and precise detail. They had a craving to paint every leaf with botanical accuracy, every wrinkle and accident of form with a microscopic faithfulness..." [2].

The name of the Brotherhood itself referred to a time when the visual art of painting was more liberated from "school rules". In his essay about the founding of the Brotherhood, William Rossetti writes:

"It would be a mistake to suppose, because they called themselves Pre-Raphaelites, that they seriously disliked the works produced by Raphael; but they disliked the works produced by Raphael's uninspired satellites...The Pre-Raphaelite Brothers entertained a deep respect and a sincere affection for the works of some of the artists who had preceded Raphael; and they thought that they should more or less be following the lead of those artists if they themselves were to develop their own individuality, disregarding school-rules." [3].

The immediate impetus for the creation of the Brotherhood occurred in the Fall of 1848, when the young men spent an evening at John Everett Millais' home on 83 Gower Street in London looking at a volume of engravings that illustrated the frescoes in the Campo Santo at Pisa. The frescoes had been created in the 14th and 15th centuries, by such artists as Benozzo Gozzoli and Orcagna. The Brotherhood identified with these pre-Raphael artists. With youthful gusto the rebels set about to undermine the status quo by rejecting the wisdom inherited from the Raphaelic High Renaissance. That wisdom, codified in the 18th century, became the school-rule of the 19th century. It was this canon the Brotherhood sought to disable.







Early Reaction to the P.R.B.

By 1850 the P.R.B. had put into practice its "Truth to Nature" dogma with several paintings exhibited during the Royal Academy's 1850 summer show. Hunt and Millais had paintings in the show. Reading a reviewer's comments about the exhibit makes it clear that the Brotherhood's assault on the established art community was having an effect.

"We cannot censure at present as amply or as strongly as we desire to do, that strange disorder of the mind or the eyes which continues to rage with unabated absurdity among a class of juvenile artists who style themselves P.R.B., which being interpreted, means Pre-Raphael-brethren...The Council of the Academy, acting in a spirit of toleration and indulgence to young artists, have now allowed these extravagances to disgrace their walls...the public may fairly require that such offensive jests should not continue to be exposed...These young artists have unfortunately become notorious by addicting themselves to an antiquated style and an affected simplicity in Painting...To become great in art, it has been said that a painter must become as a little child...but the authors of these offensive and absurd productions have continued to combine puerility or infancy of their art with the uppishness and self-sufficiency of a different period of life...That morbid infatuation which sacrifices truth, beauty and genuine feeling to mere eccentricity deserves no quarter at the hands of the public..." [4].




William Holman Hunt
"Valentine Rescuing Sylvia from Proteus" (1851)
Oil on canvas, 98.4 cm x 133.4 cm



The Germ


In August of 1849 the Brotherhood discussed the publication of a literary periodical which would function as the official organ of the P.R.B. At their meetings various names for the publication were considered including "Thoughts Toward Nature", "The P.R.B. Journal", and "The Seed". Finally, on December 19, 1849 the Brotherhood settled on The Germ as the name of their magazine. Designed as a monthly, illustrated, one-shilling literary magazine The Germ first appeared in January 1850.

Noteworthy for being an early example of an "alternative" publication, Derek Sanders, editor of Pre-Raphaelite Writing makes the following observation:

One of the innovations of the Pre-Raphaelite Movement is that species of periodical publication, the avant-garde manifesto-cum-magazine. The house magazine of the P.R.B., The Germ is the prototype of other forward-feeling journals of the arts..." [5].

There were only four issues of The Germ and mainly because of financial difficulties, it ceased publication after the April 1850 number. Despite its short life-span the magazine was influential. William Morris and his Exeter College schoolmate Edward Burne-Jones read the magazine. Inspired by the magazine, they became disciples of the Pre-Raphaelites and formed the backbone of the second wave of the movement. Morris and Burne-Jones continued the new genre of literary magazine when in 1856 they published The Oxford and Cambridge Magazine. This latter magazine, considered superior in quality to its recent ancestor, lasted a year.




(Altered) Cover: The Germ No. 2
February 1850








"P. R. B."


by Christina Rossetti

The two Rossettis (brothers they)
And Holman Hunt and John Millais
With Stevens chivalrous and bland,
And Woolner in a distant land--
In these six men I awestruck see
Embodied the great P.R.B.
D. G. Rossetti offered two
Good pictures to the public view;
Unnumbered ones great John Millais
And Holman more than I can say.

William Rossetti, calm and solemn,
Cuts up his brethern by the column.



Pre-Raphaelite Outer Links







Cosmic Player Plates


Individual Cosmic Player Plates will be published online during the season. Access to those plates as they become available will be included on this Roster by using a hypertext link placed on the player's picture.

Each plate usually includes biographical text and images, links to other related sites and other ephemera. The Cosmic Baseball Association welcomes your contributions to these player plates.

A list of available player plates will be maintained here and updated as necessary.


Available Pre-Raphaelite Player Plates

James Leathart

John Millais

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

William Bell Scott

Elizabeth Siddal

Chales Algernon Swinburne

Maria Zambaco










Notes

NOTES

1. Stevenson, page 3

2. Gaunt, page 12

3. Stanford, page 15-16

4. Stanford, page 31-32

5. Stanford, page 56





References

  • Battiscombe, Georgina. Christine Rossetti: A Divided Life. Holt, Rinehart, Winston: New York; 1981

  • Gaunt, William. The Pre-Raphaelite Dream. Schocken Books: New York; 1966

  • Packer, Lona Mosk. The Rossetti-Macmillan Letters. University of California Press: Los Angeles; 1963

  • Rose, Andrea. The Pre-Raphaelites. Paedon Press: London; 1977

  • Stanford, Derek. Editor. Pre-Raphaelite Writing: An Anthology. J.M. Dent & sons: London; 1973

  • Stevenson, Lionel. The Pre-Raphaelite Poets. W.W. Norton: New York; 1972












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1997 Pre-Raphaelite Roster
URL http://www.cosmicbaseball.com/97prbr.html
Published: May 30, 1997
Updated: October 13, 1997
Revised: February 12, 1998

Copyright © 1997 by the Cosmic Baseball Association
Email: editor@cosmicbaseball.com

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