Barsoomtown Explorers

Special Archive Plate


The Barsoomtown Explorers joined CBA's Outer Space League in 1992. The original team consisted of Mars mission space craft. The Explorers joined another Mars-oriented team, the Marsville Marchmen. The Marchmen had joined the CBA in 1988 and were a more fully diversified squad consisting of fictional and historical personalities, including Percival Lowell and Jeddak of Thark, the "fiercest" of all the many green warriors. Depending on the interest in matters Martian, a special archive plate for the Marchmen may be published.

The Explorers competed for two years in the CBA and, to be frank, their performance was lackluster at best. Nevertheless, they were a popular team and attendance figures confirm this fact. The author, Edgar Rice Burroughs managed the team both seasons and despite the performance problems he was well liked by players, fans, and the owner, the National Aeronautical Space Association (NASA).

The first attempts to explore matters Martian began on October 10, 1960 when the Soviet Union (USSR) launched a Martian probe, designated Mars 1960A. The spacecraft failed, however, before reaching Earth orbit. After several more failures, humans were able to view pictures of Mars when four years later, the United States (USA) launched Mariner 4. On July 14, 1965, Mariner 4 sent back the first space craft gathered photographs of the Red Planet. Twenty-two photographs in all were gathered by Mariner 4.

With the recent excitement generated by the study of the Martian meteorite, designated ALH84001, and the suggestion that life once existed on the planet the Incas called Auqakah, CBA is making available the 1992 team roster of the Barsoomtown Explorers. Also included on this special archive plate are links to various Mars-oriented sites accessible on the World Wide Web.




1992 Roster 1992 Stats Mars Life


Barsoomtown Explorers 1992 Roster



Mars 1960A, Shortstop

USSR Mars Probe
Launched: October 10, 1960
Did not reach Earth orbit.


Mars Site at Caltech

Mars 1960B, Infield

USSR Mars Probe
Launched: October 14, 1960
Did not reach Earth orbit.


Mars Atlas Homepage

Mars 1962A, Outfield

USSR Mars Flyby
Launched: October 24, 1962
Spacecraft failed to leave Earth orbit after the final rocket stage exploded.


MARS: The Red Planet

Mars 1, Pitcher

USSR Mars Flyby 893 kg
Launched: November 1, 1962
Communications failed en route.


From Geneva to the Planet Mars- A Chamber Opera

Mars 1962B, Pitcher

USSR Mars lander
Launched: November 4, 1962
Failed to leave Earth orbit.


Come Picnic on Mars- Poetry

Mariner 3, Firstbase

USA Mars Flyby 260 kg
Launched: November 5, 1964
Mars flyby attempt. Solar panels did not open, preventing flyby. Mariner 3 is now in a solar orbit.


The Nine Planets Glossary

Mariner 4, Secondbase

USA Mars Flyby 260 kg
Launched: November 28, 1964 (Mission ended December 20, 1967)
Mariner 4 arrived at Mars on July 14, 1965 and passed within 9,920 kilometers of the planet's surface. It returned 22 close up photos showing a cratered surface. The thin atmosphere was confirmed to be composed of carbon dioxide in the range of 510 mbar. A small intrinsic magnetic field was detected. Mariner 4 is now in a solar orbit.


Daily Martian Weather Report

Zond 2, Pitcher

USSR Mars Flyby
Launched: November 30, 1964
Contact was lost en route.


History of Astronomy Site

Mariner 6, Shortstop

USA Mars Flyby 412 kg
Launched: February 24, 1969
Mariner 6 arrived at Mars and passed within 3,437 kilometers of the planet's equatorial region. Mariner 6 took measurements of the surface and atmospheric temperature, surface molecular composition, and pressure of the atmosphere. In addition, over 200 pictures were taken. Mariner 6 is now in a solar orbit.


JPL Mars Exploration Home Page

Mariner 7, Leftfield

USA Mars Flyby 412 kg
Launched: March 27, 1969
Mariner 7 arrived at Mars on August 5, 1969, and passed within 3,551 kilometers of the planet's south pole region. Mariner 6 and 7 took measurements of the surface and atmospheric temperature, surface molecular composition, and pressure of the atmosphere. In addition, over 200 pictures were taken. Mariner 7 is now in a solar orbit.


The Martian Sun-Times

Mariner 8, Centerfield

USA Mars Flyby
Launched: May 8, 1971
Failed to reach Earth orbit.


NASA's SpaceLink Search Site

Kosmos 419, Pitcher

USSR Mars Probe
Launched: May 10, 1971
Failed to leave Earth orbit.


Soviet/Russian Mars Program

Mars 2, Catcher

USSR Mars Orbiter/Soft Lander 4,650 kg
Launched: May 19, 1971
The Mars 2 lander was released from the orbiter on November 27, 1971. It crashed landed because its breaking rockets failed no data was returned and the first human artifact was created on Mars. The orbiter returned data until 1972.


Mars 3, Infield

USSR Mars Orbiter/Soft Lander 4,643 kg
Launched: May 28, 1971
Mars 3 arrived at Mars on December 2, 1971. The lander was released and became the first successful landing on Mars. It failed after relaying 20 seconds of video data to the orbiter. The Mars 3 orbiter returned data until August, 1972. It made measurements of surface temperature and atmospheric composition.


H. G. Wells' War of the Worlds Online

Mariner 9, Rightfield

USA Mars Orbiter 974 kg
Launched: May 30, 1971 1972
Mariner 9 arrived at Mars on November 3, 1971 and was placed into orbit on November 24. This was the first US spacecraft to enter an orbit around a planet other than the Moon. At the time of its arrival a huge dust storm was in progress on the planet. Many of the scientific experiments were delayed until the storm had subsided. The first hi resolution images of the moons Phobos and Deimos were taken. River and channel like features were discovered. Mariner 9 is still in Martian orbit.


H. G. Wells' War of the Worlds Radio Broadcast Online

Mars 4, Infield

USSR Mars Orbiter 4,650 kg
Launched: July 21, 1973
Mars 4 arrived at Mars on February, 1974, but failed to go into orbit due to a malfunction of its breaking engine. It flew past the planet with in 2,200 kilometers of the surface. It returned some images and data.


Processing the "Face on Mars" Images

Mars 5, Thirdbase

USSR Mars Orbiter 4,650 kg
Launched: July 25, 1973
Mars 5 entered into orbit around Mars on February 12, 1974. It acquired imaging data for the Mars 6 and 7 missions.


Edgar Rice Burroughs Site

Mars 6, Infield

USSR Mars Orbiter/Soft Lander 4,650 kg
Launched: August 5, 1973
On March 12, 1974, Mars 6 entered into orbit and launched its lander. The lander returned atmospheric descent data, but failed on its way down.


Mars 7, Outfield

USSR Mars Orbiter/Soft Lander 4,650 kg
Launched: August 9, 1973
On March 6, 1974, Mars 7 failed to go into orbit about Mars and the lander missed the planet. Carrier and lander are now in a solar orbit.


Mars'96-Russian flight mission

Viking 1, Pitcher

USA Mars Orbiter/Lander 3,399 kg
Launched: August 20, 1975 August 7, 1980
Viking 1 and 2 were designed after the Mariner spacecraft. They consisted of an orbiter and lander. The orbiter weighed 900 kg and the lander 600 kg. Viking 1 went into orbit about Mars on June 19, 1976. The lander touched down on July 20, 1976 on the western slopes of Chryse Planitia. Both landers had experiments to search for Martian micro organism. The results of these experiments are still being debated. The landers provided detailed color panoramic views of the Martian terrain. They also monitored the Martian weather. The orbiters mapped the planet's surface, acquiring over 52,000 images. Viking 1 orbiter was deactivate on August 7, 1980 when it ran out of altitude control propellant. Viking 1 lander was accidentally shut down on November 13, 1982, and communication was never regained.


Viking 2, Pitcher

USA Mars Orbiter/Lander 3,399 kg
Launched: September 9, 1975 July 25, 1978
Viking 1 and 2 were designed after the Mariner spacecraft. They consisted of an orbiter and lander. The orbiter weighed 900 kg and the lander 600 kg. Viking 2 went into orbit about Mars on July 24, 1976. The lander touched down on August 7, 1976 at Utopia Planitia. Both landers had experiments to search for Martian micro organism. The results of these experiments are still being debated. The landers provided detailed color panoramic views of the Martian terrain. They also monitored the Martian weather. The orbiters mapped the planet's surface, acquiring over 52,000 images. Viking 2 orbiter was deactivate on July 25, 1978 when it ran out of altitude control propellant. Viking 2 lander used Viking 1 orbiter as a communications relay, and had to be shut down at the same time as the orbiter on August 7, 1980.


Viking Information Page

Phobos 1, Pitcher

USSR Mars Orbiter/Lander 5,000 kg
Launched: July 7, 1988
Phobos 1 was sent to investigate the Martian moon Phobos. It was lost en route to Mars through a command error on September 2, 1988.


Martian Terraformists

Phobos 2, Pitcher

USSR Phobos Flyby/Lander 5,000 kg
Launched: July 12, 1988
Phobos 2 arrived at Mars and was inserted into orbit on January 30, 1989. The orbiter moved within 800 kilometers of Phobos and then failed. The lander never made it to Phobos.


Mars Observer, Designated hitter/Outfield

USA Mars Orbiter
Launched: September 25, 1992
Communication was lost with Mars Observer on August 21, 1993, just before it was to be inserted into orbit.


NASA, Team Owner

National Aeronautical and Space Administration


Percival Lowell, General Manager

American Astronomer
1855-1916


Edgar Rice Burroughs, Field Manager

American Writer
1917-####


Coaches


Cydonia Fields, Home Park

Capacity: 15,303


1992 Roster 1992 Stats 1992 Mars Life


Barsoomtown Explorers 1992 Statistics



PITCHER          ERA    IP     R   ER   BB    K    W    L

Kosmos419 3.33 208 83 77 67 131 11 13 Viking1 3.36 177 77 66 81 132 9 8 Mars1962B 3.47 192 85 74 65 96 13 14 Zond2 3.56 162 73 64 59 106 8 5 Phobos1 3.58 196 95 78 91 126 10 12 Viking2 3.84 176 87 75 70 114 6 5 Phobos2 3.94 194 99 85 71 99 8 18 Mars1 4.43 185 102 91 54 94 6 16
Totals 3.68 1490 701 610 558 898 71 91


Batter Pos BA AB H HR RBI
Mariner6 ss .321 112 36 2 7 Mariner9 rf .301 352 106 7 29 Mariner8 cf .294 408 120 7 44 Mars2 c .292 418 122 4 42 Mars6 if .283 276 78 5 34 Mars3 if .275 367 101 0 28 Mariner4 2b .274 277 76 2 17 Mars1962A of .272 606 165 47 128 Mars5 3b .270 244 66 5 34 Mars4 if .270 656 177 0 62 Mars Observer dh/of .266 414 110 6 45 Mars1960A if .264 91 24 2 4 Mars1960B if .249 381 95 11 56 Mariner7 lf .248 278 69 5 20 Mars7 of .211 265 56 1 21 Mariner3 1b .201 628 126 38 92
Totals 0.265 5773 1527 142 663

A Martian meteorite, estimated to be 4.5 million Earth years old, may contain the fossil record of a microscopic form of Martian life. This Martian life form existed over 3.6 billion years ago. The meteorite fell to Earth 13,000 years ago. But it wasn't until 1984 when a team from the United States, representing the National Science Foundation, discovered the meteorite in Antarctica. Twelve years after the rock's discovery and after intensive study, including electron microscope examination, scientists announced in August 1996 that they think a primitive bacteria-like Martian life form once existed.

The evidence is a rock from Mars called ALH84001 (ALH is for Allan Hills, the site the rock was discovered by Roberta Score. It could also stand for Alien Life Hypothesis). While this discovery may not represent the disclosure of a super-intelligent species capable of constructing a humanoid face in the sands of Cydonia, or the little green Martians that some thought built a system of intricate canals, it nevertheless is astounding and provocative to think that life existed on the planet closest to Earth. Research conducted by among others, Laurie Leshin Watson, determined that the rock samples contain water that is the same as the current Martian atmosphere. Scientists have estimated that the Martian past was similar to Earth's current conditions, warm and rainy. The Viking missions of the 1970s were sent to Mars to explore the possibility of life on the Red Planet. In addition to dispelling the "canal" theories of Percival Lowell, the data about life on Mars returned by the Viking missions were negative.

But now, through a cosmic twist of fate, the landing of a meteorite, we may be closer to accepting the fact that life exists elsewhere in the Universe, and maybe as close as next door.

I want everyone to understand that we are not talking about 'little green men.' These are extremely small, single-cell structures that somewhat resemble bacteria on Earth. There is no evidence or suggestion that any higher life form ever existed on Mars.

from Statement of Daniel Goldin, NASA Administrator, August 6,1996
See the Full Statement of Administrator Goldin


1992 Roster 1992 Stats Mars Life

On Phobos [one of the two Martian moons], a decent pitcher could throw a ball into orbit, go inside, have breakfast, come back in an hour-and-a-half and hit his own pitch for a home run...
Ernest Underhay,Gladwin Planetarium Astronomer

Note:

The CBA would like to express our appreciation for the work done by Mr. Calvin J. Hamilton at the Chronology of Space Exploration site. Historical details about the various mission players on the roster are derived from Mr. Hamilton's site.



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1992 Barsoomtown Explorers- Special Archive Plate
URL http://www.cosmicbaseball.com/92be.html
Published: August 12, 1996
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